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A Love Story

March 31, 2012

I did not get to read this love story when it came out last december, but I am happy that I got to read it today and I hope all of you learn something amazing from it, as I have. Although the writer and his wife died on thursday somewhat tragically, we can see that they truly truly loved each other. 

From New York Times 

A Love Story and Redemption by Charles D. Snelling

Sometimes, one has a story inside that just has to be put down on paper. In this case, a very personal story and a love story. One does not embark on such an exercise without considerable trepidations. Life stories and love stories are so personal. Still, I had a friend who always said, “What is most personal is most general,” meaning that the things that each of us thinks is unique in ourselves may, more often than not, be part of the universal experience, or at least the universal awareness.

To get to my love story, I will have to drag my reader through a hundred years of family history and 80 years of my own. I’m sorry to burden the reader with slogging through all this, but I can’t get to where I want to go unless I do.

I am my father’s son; same genes and chromosomes. We have shared the same interests in knowledge, in science, in innovation, and in invention. We have shared the same desire to make the world a little better place because of our work. Oh yes, his career was much more significant and contributing than mine. He had more inventions, better inventions, and had a pivotal role in vital developments, some of which affect our lives very much after more than 100 years. This is a story, not about the similarities of my father’s and my lives, but the differences. This is a story about how my wife Adrienne changed my life so that it would be so very different from my father’s life. This is a story about how my life became, for me at least, much more human, much more satisfying, and much happier than it otherwise would have been. It is a love story.

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